The Lore:

The Jedi Living Academy Program. Tier One is open to all members.
Locked
User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

The Lore:

Post: # 12733Post Opie Macleod
Sun Jan 17, 2016 5:11 pm

Welcome to the Lore lecture series. This is where we look at the fictional inspiration and how it has lead to some of the practice and philosophies that we Jedi hold dear. Some people after a time want to drop the Jedi name. They want to distance themselves from Star Wars and leave the fiction in some forgotten dark closet. It is my opinion that this misses a major reason why we even became Jedi in the first place - why this community even exists.

There is something to be said for making sure we do not wander into the land of delusion. Saying our prayers to Yoda and praising George Lucas as some sort of prophet. But the best way to do that in my opinion is not to ignore our inspiration, but to embrace it. To offer the lessons that sprung directly from the fiction. This helps you and others understand why Jedi applies and where a lot of our practices and ideals come from (as said).

Now in this section I'll probably quote and reference a few of our first lessons in the Online Jedi Community. This is because when we were first starting out the fiction is all we had. It was our dream, our focus, and our goal. We wanted to become Jedi Knights like those we saw in the movies. So our lessons were derived from the fiction and would grow and evolve from there. Over time we would use existing practices and concepts from known religions and philosophies to supplement. It has been through this mesh of fiction, existing idea,s and our own experiences living as Jedi that would create the outlook and lessons we have today. So I'll likely draw on some of these first lessons to show how we processed them.

So lets begin our journey through the fiction that inspired the real life Jedi.
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore:

Post: # 12734Post Opie Macleod
Sun Jan 17, 2016 6:07 pm

-= The Lore: Lecture One =-
The Jedi Code. A core fictional text that has stayed with the Jedi Community since 1987. Well, I mean, it was created in 1987 and has been an active teaching tool since 1995 at the start of the online Community. However you want to list that the Jedi Code has been there from the start. And it was created for the Star Wars Tabletop Role-Playing Game. But we won't get too much into the history of it as there is a history lesson on the Jedi Code you'll have later on.

For now we are going to look at the updated version of the Jedi Code. In 2003 BioWare released the video game Knights of the Old Republic (available on mobile now). They combined the 1987 version of the Jedi Code with the 1996 version. This lead to the more popular and known version of the Jedi Code.
There is no emotion; there is peace.
There is no ignorance; there is knowledge.
There is no passion; there is serenity.
There is no chaos; there is harmony.
There is no death; there is the Force.


Now if you want a fun assignment. Watch The Empire Strikes Back and try to see if you can spot the Yoda quotes which help inspire this code. Or perhaps just scenes, like Obi-Wan being one with the Force which might be where we get the last line, maybe? But can fiction be applicable, practical, and beneficial? Right? We have our little checklist to run through. Now of the surface the Jedi Code might not stack up. So we can look at another way to determine validity. What inspired it?

Now if you compared the Code to Empire then you probably get where the ideas come from. But how about that format? It seems an interesting way to phrase the concepts doesn't it? It has never been confirmed by the author of the Jedi section of the Role-playing guide, but it has long been speculated that the inspiration for the Jedi Code is the Heart Sutra. The lines/section people point to the most is the very familiar:
"There is no ignorance,
and no end to ignorance.
There is no old age and death,
and no end to old age and death.
There is no suffering, no cause of suffering,
no end to suffering, no path to follow.
There is no attainment of wisdom,
and no wisdom to attain.
"
(http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/heartsutra.html)

This format helps make the Jedi Code have that exotic feel to it. That hint of mystery and wisdom which must be unwrapped through meditation and reflection. Of course the problem with such things is not everyone approaches material in that way. And thus over the years the Jedi Code has faced a lot of opposition to being used. There is no emotion? That is ridiculous! Of course we have emotions. It is a part of being human. We all have ignorance in one form or another. So on and so forth the arguments go until the very idea of the Jedi Code just seems silly.

But is that what the Jedi Code is teaching? Well, we can combat it with the very line of thinking of those against it. They would say that it is fiction and should be left there. So lets use the fiction to see if it holds up. Think of any Jedi that comes to mind. Movie, tv shows, books, whichever Jedi you like. Got them? Okay, now think of a Jedi that might be their opposite or at least is pretty different to that first Jedi. Got them? Excellent. Now in both cases think - do those Jedi ever show emotion? Do those Jedi ever show ignorance (or lack of knowing something)? Do they ever show passion? Do they die? Did any of those things make them less of a Jedi? Less of a role-model? Less of a person or hero? Ever they thrown out of the order? Or do you feel there are plenty of examples of Jedi feeling emotions, passion, and still being Jedi? That they acknowledged their limited knowledge and were still Jedi?

Now we take that a step further. How about in everyday life? Obviously we are all going to feel emotion. Passion is a vital part of the human experience. So what might the Jedi Code really being telling us as real life Jedi? What lessons might we gain from this piece of Jedi Lore? Now to be clear there are many ways to explore and interpret the Jedi Code. However this isn't one of those - there is no wrong answer moments. Because there are wrong ways to go about this (unfortunately I know this from first-hand experience and second-hand experience). But we are here to learn right. So I'll give my own personal growth. My first Impression of the Code to how I view it now. And then it will be assignment time for you.

My First View of the Code (as short and basic as possible - I was about 15 when I held to this):
A Jedi feels no emotion and is always at peace.
A Jedi erases all ignorance by continually learning new things (learn everything basically).
A Jedi has no passion and thus is serene.
A Jedi erases chaos by embracing balance in all things.
A Jedi has no attachments expect to the Force and so nothing ever dies.

How I tend to view the Code currently (at the time of writing I was 35):
Be at peace with your emotions.
Acknowledge your ignorance and learn from it.
Let your passion lead you to serenity.
A single note cannot harmonize by itself.
The universe and life exist beyond our perception.

This is for me. It was my outlook. This does not make it gospel, right, or incorruptible. It does not mean you should agree with it. I am not trying to convince of anything or say you should adopt my views. I simply want to offer this as an example of growth and a way one Jedi has viewed the Jedi Code (in the history lesson of the Code we'll visit more ways Jedi have looked at it). So don't just take this and be like - good enough for me. I want you to really look at the Jedi Code and find your own explanation and use for it.
#####
:: The Lore Assignment One ::
So for the next couple of weeks I'd like you to reflect on the Jedi Code and seek to apply it to your life. I want you to examine it, meditate upon it, and explore the possible uses and meanings it has. After about a couple weeks of really digging into it and seeking to apply it to your life as you see fit. I want you to answer a few questions.
Does the Jedi Code survive our Lore to Reality test? (In other-words the APBP Test, is it Applicable, Practical, Beneficial, and have a Positive effect? Is it valid for everyday life?).
What is your breakdown/interpretation of the Jedi Code? (What does each line mean)
Do you feel the Jedi Code has a place in our teachings or do you feel it should be left to the world of fiction? Why?
Last edited by Opie Macleod on Tue Jan 03, 2017 6:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore: Lecture Two

Post: # 12735Post Opie Macleod
Sun Jan 17, 2016 7:59 pm

-= The Lore: Lecture Two =-
Jedi Lore - The study of our Fictional Roots. These are the source elements in which Jedi thought and ideals are born. Things we have looked at, looked to, and continue to use as inspiration to this day. We have sought to study these elements over the years and make them applicable to everyday life. They have been the source of many discussions, debates, and lessons. Always wondering, Can we one day be like the fiction? Better? Can we learn from fictional mistakes to avoid real hazards in the future? Here is where fiction and reality meet, and begin the journey of discovery that each Jedi has undertaken in order to live the dream of being a Jedi Knight.

Back in 1997, 1999, as the movies and books came out, these were what we had to draw upon. We didn't have veteran, experienced Jedi to rely on. We didn't have people who had truly been living the Jedi Path and Philosophy for years and years. People who had created their own Jedi Lessons and Works. And so these were what guided us along. We have expanded the lessons here to include more works since that time. And set the general idea that Star Wars is the inspiration, it is the original source, but we have expanded upon that, taken our experiences and studies and turn fictional ideas into applicable philosophical ideals.

To help drive this home lets look at one of the more enjoyed movies of the franchise - The Empire Strikes Back.
Luke Skywalker goes to Dagobah off of what he assumes is a delusional dream. He is trusting in his intuition and instincts. He feels this is something that needs to be done and what he saw, what he felt was real enough. We see his doubt creeping in as he gets frustrated with his situation (stuck on a swamp planet). Eventually Luke discovers who Yoda is and gets to begin his Jedi training. In this training we see Luke running, jumping, climbing, and swinging. Very active, very physically involved. We see him in meditation, concentrating, focusing his mind, directing his will. We see Luke get lectured on the calmness of mind and being passive. We see Luke face himself and the darkness within. And we see that tough choices are something Jedi face, that sacrifice is something Jedi must face and make difficult decisions.

Easy enough to pull certain concepts from the Dagobah scenes in relation to Jedi. Physical Wellness. Emotional Stability. Intellectual Growth. The burden and responsibility of being a Jedi. But why take my word for it? I am just some weird guy behind a computer who is type things at you. Instead, lets look at it more specifically.
"You will know. When calm, at peace, passive."
I like this as it seems to highlight that peace leads to knowledge. A concept we will visit next week. But when we stop and think about our lives does it not ring true? That the times when we are calm, at peace with ourselves, our emotions aren't all over the place - we tend to make pretty good decisions then. We tend to know what we need to do at those times.
Peace and Calmness became a staple in the Jedi Community and lesson ideals from this simple line. One which other beliefs, faiths, and practices have found to be true as well. So there is an endorsement of this concept. Which we know isn't much of a surprise given that Lucas was inspired by other established traditions and beliefs.

"What's in there?"
"Only what you take with you."
I just love this exchange as I think it certainly applies to more than just "the Cave." We chose what we carry around with us. Of course the whole scene and concept of the dark side within the movie really was powerful to me. However there was a down side to this which is better reflected in the lines: "But beware of the dark side. Anger, fear, aggression; the dark side of the Force are they. Easily they flow, quick to join you in a fight. If once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny, consume you it will," unfortunately many Jedi took this to mean anger is bad, don't ever feel it.
Emotions are not that simple. They are not that black and light. They are guides. They offer plenty of information, most of all about yourself. Fear, Anger, Sadness, these are not to be condemned, but understood. What are they trying to tell you about yourself, your outlook, and the situation? Emotions are not to be ignored, bottled up, or suppressed. This area serves as a wonderful reminder of a very important lesson:
Star Wars is not our bible. It is not to be taken at face-value and considered unchangeable. It falls to us as Jedi to look at the fiction and see what it is trying to say and how that applies into our everyday lives. Is it practical? Is it applicable? Is it beneficial? Does it have a positive impact? If the answer is yes across the board then we tend to run with it - even in fictional form. Something we will come back to.

"So certain are you. Always with you what cannot be done."
Heh. Oh Jedi and defeatism - I could write a book. We will look at this concept more within the Jedi Rules of Behavior. But I do like pointing out where the movie influences our fictional sources that we use to help define and develop the Jedi Path. We see here though a clear note that a Jedi keeps an open mind. That their focus directly affects their efforts (hopefully another Star Wars quote popped into your head there). This is simply a wonderful reminder and one I have needed more than once.

"Decide you must, how to serve them best."
This can get lost within the exchange. The scene plays out rather quickly, but I like isolating it because it is reflective of a lesson Jedi often have to learn the hard way. First that you will be faced with tough choices in life. Second, there is always more than one option at hand. And lastly, that it really does fall to you to determine the best course of action forward.

"no more will I teach you today."
Patience. I mean there are a couple other good patience quotes to use. Especially about a Jedi needs to eat as well. But I think this is most relevant to our training and this academy. You can't learn everything in one day. You are going to be doing this awhile. I have been trying to become a Jedi for over twenty-five years. I have been involved with the online Jedi Community for at least twenty of those years. It is a process. It takes time. Granted a bit less for you because you don't have to try and work this stuff out from scratch, but still - TIME. So patience - don't try to cram it into your head all at once.
Seriously - I did a survey of the Jedi Community and one of the most repeated things a Jedi would advise their younger self? Slow down. Enjoy the training, enjoy the process. Take your time and don't try to do it all at once. It is like being a kid - don't rush to adulthood, enjoy your time.So Patience young Jedi.
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Two ::
Your Turn! I am going to leave some Jedi quotes here and I want you to tell me (or feel free to imagine you have a Jedi Apprentice you are teaching) how you think they may relate to living as a Jedi in real life. Don't worry - we get that this is basically day one of your training. Still a fun exercise and it puts you in the shoes of those of us who started way back when. :happy: But use what we talked about in the lesson to help you here. When looking at the quote consider, is it applicable? Is it practical? Is it beneficial? Would/does it have a positive impact?
1.) Yoda: A Jedi must have the deepest commitment, the most serious mind.
2.) Luke: I don't, I don't believe it.
Yoda: That is why you fail.
3.) Yoda: A Jedi's strength flows from the Force.
4.) Mind what you have learned. Save you it can.
Last edited by Opie Macleod on Thu Feb 04, 2016 10:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore:

Post: # 12736Post Opie Macleod
Sun Jan 17, 2016 8:30 pm

-= The Lore: Lecture Three =-
The Challenge of Temptation
Temptation poses the greatest threat to a Jedi, and the fall of a Jedi Knight often begins with one rationalized decision or errant choice.... Temptation takes a myriad of forms. The simplest urges the Jedi provide an easy answer to a complex question. The answer might be immediately satisfying but creates long-term problems.... Another form of temptation comes from the power of adulation and the threat of success itself. Accepting personal rewards is dangerous for a Jedi, for it inspires the belief in their own abilities that might exceed the truth. In effect, the Jedi comes to believe their own hype. The Jedi learns that true satisfaction come from the sense of well-being within, not from approval of others.... The third form of temptation is the nature of power itself. The Jedi have been established as a force for good, which keeps them from using their abilities to rule the masses. This is an extremely powerful temptation, because Jedi often face ignorance and folly in their daily lives. The Jedi can be tempted to deal with such folly (bureaucracy is particularly rife with it), yet once that kind of interference starts, it soon escalates to a point where a Jedi encourages the very ignorance they once fought against, in the name of ruling others "for their own best interest."

-=-

Lightsaber Syndrome
Martial Artists who reach a certain level of expertise might look forward to an opportunity to use what they have learned. They think: "I'm just waiting for someone to give me grief, so I can wipe the floor with him." Sometimes they get tired of waiting and become more belligerent and aggressive, in hopes of provoking someone into starting a fight. They have forgotten -or never quite accepted- that martial arts are about self-defense, not showing off what they have learned.
Some Jedi fall into the same category. Having lightsabers and force powers presents a tremendous temptation to use them, and some players get anxious waiting to use them. As a result, they begin practicing un-Jedilike behavior. Attacking first, trying to solve every problem with the Force, and deliberately creating situations that might allow them to show off their skills.
Usually, just pointing out that a player is suffering from Lightsaber Syndrome is enough to get them to take a step back and examine their actions. The player may just need a refresher on the Jedi philosophy to get back to it.


Here we are looking at two role-playing lessons from the Power of the Jedi Role-Playing Guide. The first one looks at the ease in which a Jedi may find themselves seeking to justify their actions. It was this concept that spawned the "Righteousness" Misconception in the very first Jedi Circle. People can feel as a Jedi and in pursuit of peace and justice that their actions are above reproach. That they are allowed to behavior in any manner they desire so long as they resolve the issue (even if only for the short-term). Many a "Jedi master" in our community could provide example enough for this over the years.

The second one is a lesson I often call - the Bullied Becoming the Bully. It happens when you empower a person too quickly without allowing for ethics and understanding to sink in. A person stepped on their entire life (doesn't have to be physical bullying - just feeling like you never had a voice) finding themselves and believing in their self-worth can be a beautiful thing. It can also lead one to over-reach and assume all people are trying to push them back down. So they "don't take any crap from any one!" They begin to dominate the conversation, they begin to push and belittle the voices of others, they push people in the direction the Jedi wants them to go. Because they'll never be a doormat again.

These are things that all Jedi Students have to be mindful of. These aren't evil. These aren't malicious. They are simply basic human nature overriding Jedi nature. One can even argue they are fair responses to the life lived, but they are not Jedi responses. And while no Jedi is doormat, and I'll gladly stand with any Jedi people seek to trample on, we are not tyrants, bullies, and/or there to make people do what we "know to be best."

I have failed here as a Jedi before. I have failed here as a Mentor before. Thus why this is getting a bit more rambling from me than the other Lore lessons. Come back to this lesson often (even if just the lore quotes above). Keep these close to heart as you grow as a Jedi.
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Three ::
Do you feel these quotes (above) pass our APBP Test? Why or Why Not?
What did you enjoy about them? If anything.
What do you feel is off or wrong about them? If anything.
-=-
You are at the movies on a date. While waiting in line to buy tickets you notice five boys around 18 to 23 years of age. They are harassing another male of a similar age in a wheelchair who appears physically and slightly mentally handicapped. The boys are calling him insulting names, pushing the chair around, poking the person in the wheelchair; who has asked them to stop repeatedly.
Your date looks at you and says, "Do something."
As a Jedi, how do you resolve the situation?
Give an example of resolving the situation with lightsaber syndrome.
What is the difference? Why should you try one way over the other? If at all.
Last edited by Opie Macleod on Wed Apr 27, 2016 8:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore: Lecture Four

Post: # 12737Post Opie Macleod
Mon Jan 18, 2016 1:14 am

-= The Lore: Lecture Four =-
This one is going to be a little different. I don't like hitting new students with heavy subjects so soon into training, but this is important (because ethics isn't heavy or important :facepalm:). At one time I did a little survey of the online Jedi Community. Looked at different experiences of Jedi. It was a really educational experience for me, but the main thing I noticed was that all Jedi wanted some sort of lesson which directly dealt with acceptance, tolerance, and understanding the glass walls of humanity.

Diversity awareness is important. As a Jedi you'll be in a community that is global. We have members from all walks of life. Different cultures, religions, countries, beliefs, are all going to be seen and encountered. This is a great thing because it offers us a chance to learn new things about the varying ways humans experience the world. But we are all by-products of the society we grew up in. There are certain ideas and concepts that have simply been taken as truth because that is how we grew up. And you may find these challenged as the Jedi Community - well, the Jedi Path, the Jedi Way, is a very open, accepting, and welcoming Path for all people. Anyone, absolutely anyone, can chose to be a Jedi. Your gender, sexual preference, religion, country of birth, skin color, has absolutely no effect on whether or not you are a Jedi (or to what extent). That is all glass wall silliness that doesn't determine a person's worth or value.

Now, a valid question would be - what does this have to with Jedi Lore? Seems I am just pointing out the obvious. Jedi is the label that matters. A recurring theme in our training and path in fact. So why the extra blah blah on it and on lesson three no less? As I said, its important and we do have Lore to back it up.

Now I don't mean the obvious Jedi Lore where there were several Jedi Knights and Masters of varying gender, species, cultures, religions, colors, and so forth in the Star Wars universe. No, that is way too easy to point out. Besides some of the best diverse characters never got the screen time fans like myself wanted. Like were is my Kit Fisto and Aalya Secura tv show with them teaming up and saving the galaxy? Come on. :cough: But I digress (besides I get Rey and Finn and Poe doing exactly that and that is close enough for me because I love them to pieces).

So where can we look at specific Jedi teachings for something that might fit Opie's the Jedi Community is wonderful because of our Diversity rambling? Well lets just make it the assignment shall we?
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Four ::
The Jedi Rules of Behavior states: A Jedi Honors Life.
The Jedi Creed (a.k.a. Skywalker Code) states: A Jedi respects life, in all forms.
First - do these two fictional concepts pass our Jedi test? (Applicable, Practical, Beneficial, Positive)
Second - How do these concepts apply to issues like Racism, Sexism (and Gender Bias), Able-ism, and other prejudice (if at all)?
Last edited by Opie Macleod on Sat Feb 13, 2016 8:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore: Lecture Five

Post: # 12738Post Opie Macleod
Mon Jan 18, 2016 1:26 am

-= The Lore: Lecture Five =-
"Nothing is lost where the Force dwells, and the Force is everywhere." - Obi-wan Kenobi, recalling Jedi teachings, p. 89 Jedi Apprentice Series - The Hidden Past

"Leave you, the Force cannot. Constant, it is. If find it you cannot, look inside, not out, you must." - Yoda, as recalled by Obi-wan Kenobi, p. 6 Jedi Apprentice Series - The Uncertain Path

It really doesn't matter how you define the Force, some concepts transcend that. It is why I enjoy the Ineffable definition I use. Because even within that vague and undefined construct certain inspirational quotes still apply to every Jedi. The idea that the Force is something one can lose? No, that just doesn't fit with what we have experienced over the many years the Jedi Community has been experiencing and exploring the Force.

Even still there is an inner strength within you. Label however you want. Determination, willpower, mystical energy, the power of God, it really doesn't matter. What matters is that you do in fact have this strength. It has helped you survive to this point. It has helped lead you to this point. You are here, you are training, and you are growing as a person. That is not something anyone can take away from you. This website can disappear tomorrow - erased from existence - and you'd still be strong, capable, and have a drive to be the best version of you as possible. Not only that, but to seek to improve and better the world around you. That is all you. That has been your choice and no one has forced you to stay here.

So however you'd like to approach this, you can. I feel confident that whatever your definition of the Force is, that it will stand up to our APBP Test on these quotes. This is one of the things I enjoy about embracing our fiction, our inspiration, it shows that undercurrent of truth. That core ideology that is present at all Jedi Groups because it is within all Jedi.
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Five ::
Well lets make sure I am not proven wrong huh?
So first, give me a quick and basic summary/definition of the Force, to you.
Now, do these two quotes hold up to our APBP Test with your definition of the Force?
How do you feel you can apply these to your everyday life?
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore: Lecture Six

Post: # 12739Post Opie Macleod
Mon Jan 18, 2016 5:07 am

-= The Lore: Lecture Six =-
"You can't force people to be just and decent. Such qualities must arise from within." - Qui-Gon Jinn, Jedi Apprentice (The Rising Force pg. 117)
-=-
"We cannot try to right every wrong. All creatures must learn to stand for what is right, and not always rely upon the Jedi." - Obi-Wan Kenobi, Jedi Apprentice (The Rising Force pg. 123)
-=-
"The Jedi can guide. We can teach. We can help people to help themselves. But we are not an Army. If a people are truly determined to write themselves out of existence, there is little we can do." - Obi-Wan Kenobi (Obi-Wan and Anakin comic issue 1)

It is well known that Jedi are defenders of peace and justice in the galaxy, at least within Star Wars. Certainly there is a little bit of a difference in real life. Still it is that fight for what is right that inspires many people to want to become Jedi. How that translate of course is something we are exploring throughout this training program. But there is often a flip side that is too often ignored.

A harsh reality is that we cannot save everyone. A Jedi is not all-powerful, even if Anakin whines about it forever. Just not how it works. So I have highlighted some good Jedi Lore which serve to remind you young Jedi, that there is going to be times when you cannot help someone. You cannot force people to do the right thing or be good people. It is important that you respect free will and the choice of others as much as possible. To do otherwise turns the Jedi into a dictator which tries to force people to behave in a specific manner "for their own good."

Of course me being like - don't do this! Probably doesn't really make the cut right? And I am not a fictional Jedi. So why don't we instead partake in some Qui-Gon Jinn wisdom from one of my favorite books series, Jedi Apprentice.
"I only win a fight. It's a small, small victory. There are greater battles to be won - battles of the heart. Sometimes, with patience and reason and by setting a good example, I have won more than a fight - I have turned my adversary into a friend." - The Rising Force pg. 117 All of this I feel gives us plenty to look at and ponder. So lets jump into our known assignment.
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Six ::
Do all of these quotes pass our APBP Test?
How do you feel these apply to everyday life?
Does it directly affect how you viewed the Jedi and the Jedi Path?
How do you feel these quotes relate to Lore Three (Lightsaber Syndrome and Temptation)? If at all.
Last edited by Opie Macleod on Sat Feb 13, 2016 9:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore: Lecture Seven

Post: # 12740Post Opie Macleod
Mon Jan 18, 2016 4:40 pm

-= The Lore: Lecture Seven =-
The movies are what captured the major of people's imgainations. Whether it was the original 1977 release of Star Wars, the 1999 release of Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, or something in-between, the movies is what gives our introduction and inspiration.

Obi-Wan Kenobi is a Padawan, a student still learning and gaining understanding in the Jedi Ways. His Master is Qui-Gon Jinn, an older Jedi with plenty of years of experience living as a Jedi. There are several exchanges that take place within the movie which help show the Jedi's stance on certain topics. Yet some times there seems to be conflict in ideology.  One of these examples happens early in the movie where Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan discuss sensing something and where one's focus should be. It happens as follows:
OBI-WAN: I have a bad feeling about this.
QUI-GON: I don't sense anything.
OBI-WAN: It's not about the mission Master, it's something elsewhere, elusive.
QUI-GON: Don't center on your anxiety Obi-Wan. Keep your concentration here and now where it belongs.
OBI-WAN: Master Yoda says I should be mindful of the future.
QUI-GON : But not at the expense of the moment. Be mindful of the living Force my young Padawan.
OBI-WAN: Yes Master...

Here is my personal take on this exchange: I see three major elements being presented here. One, that Jedi should keep their focus to the situation at hand, in the present. Worrying too much of the future can create a blind spot in the present. It is important to acknowledge the affects of our actions, but focusing too much on the what if scenario can cause someone to miss important choices and developments within the present situation.

Two, that Jedi took council from other senior Jedi. And that conflicted at times, or so it seems. But each Jedi was a different individual and had a certain way of explaining things. And while it may seem like conflicting ideals, we see that perhaps it is just a different way of delivering the same message. We notice Qui-Gon does not belittle Yoda or correct Yoda's statements, but instead helped Obi-Wan understand the connection between them.

Third, respect. It is said in the rules of Jedi behavior to honor the student and likewise for the student to honor the Master. You can clearly see this respect, Qui-Gon does not belittle, insult, or ignore Obi-Wan's concerns and questions. He helps clarify them and passes on understanding to his student. At the same time Obi-Wan listens, learns, and acknowledges the lesson given to him by his Master, he does not try to argue him or prove him wrong. He questions what he doesn't understand and when understanding is reached he acknowledges it.
I see this as a great example of a teaching relationship. Learning, Questioning, Discussion, Understanding. This is what we as Jedi should strive for. Both in our community and as teacher and student.

These are my views on this small scene. Yet as we see here, different Jedi, different views. So lets now look at Jedi Ogion's (former Co-Creator of the Temple of the Jedi) view of the scene/quotes.
A Jedi's Focus by Jedi Ogion -
"Don't center on your anxiety, Obi-Wan. Keep your concentration here and now where it belongs." -- Jedi Master Qui-Gon Jinn

To be anxious is to be worried about some uncertain event or matter. It is not unnatural for a person to become anxious over the future, and it is easy to become overly anxious about the future, as it is always in motion and difficult to see. It is also a simple matter to become anxious about the Dark Side, since its paths are clouded from our view. However, anxiety over the future or the Dark Side (and those who follow its paths) is easily converted into fear. Fear is the beginning of the path to the Dark Side. Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering.

"Master Yoda says I should be mindful of the future." -- Obi-Wan Kenobi

At the same time, a Jedi must always remember that the actions he takes in the here and now will affect the future, perhaps drastically altering it. A Jedi must carefully consider all possible outcomes of whatever action he takes. While others blunder through life without contemplating the Will of the Force, a Jedi must always be mindful of this, and act so that its purposes are fulfilled.

"But not at the expense of the moment. Be mindful of the living Force, my young Padawan." -- Jedi Master Qui-Gon Jinn

A Jedi must not spend so much time meditating on potential outcomes and possible futures that he loses sight of why he is making the choice. Too much time spent contemplating what could be will cause the Jedi to miss an opportunity to act. And to not act is sometimes worse than to act wrongly.

May the Force be with you, now and forever.
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Seven ::
Do these quotes pass our APBP Test?
What are your general thoughts on the quote, what do you take away from it?
How do you feel this relates to your time in the Academy (if at all)?
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore: Lecture Eight

Post: # 12741Post Opie Macleod
Mon Jan 18, 2016 4:51 pm

-= The Lore: Lecture Eight =-
Emotional Understanding can be a real challenge for Jedi. There is a lot of thought given to emotions and the Jedi Way in various forms. For some reason Yoda's encouragement of peace and calm has been viewed as stoic and unemotional. So we see a lot of Jedi thought in the fiction which discourages emotional entanglements. But how do these measure up to real life? Is a detached, non-emotional mindset what a Jedi truly strives for in everyday life? Lets look at two quotes which directly address emotions, but in slightly different ways and see how they hold up.

"Relationships with family members are fraught with powerful emotions. Such extremes are to be avoided. Anger and hate are the worst, but even love can lead to folly.... Emotional entanglements can be dangerous. They can impair rational thought, they can lead to outburst of uncontrolled emotion. A Jedi must be above such things..... Love can only obscure and confuse the matter." - Bastila Shan, Knights of the Old Republic (video game)

-=-

"Which one is our enemy?"
"Anger is our enemy. Greed and fear are also our enemies. You do not need to fight right now. Haste is another enemy." - Qui-gon Jinn, p. 109 Jedi Apprentice Series - The Rising Force.

Don't be quick to accept or dismiss here. There are some valid points in each quote. Likewise there are some things which require us to take a closer look. It is a question of how these things affect of in life. So lets a take a look shall we?
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Eight ::
Tackle each quote one at a time and answer.
Do they hold up to our APBP Test?
What lesson/message do you take away from these quotes?
Should the ideals presented be applied to everyday Jedi?
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore: Lecture Nine

Post: # 12742Post Opie Macleod
Mon Jan 18, 2016 4:56 pm

-= The Lore: Lecture Nine =-
For are two subjects I want to smash together. The Future and the future.... The first is a thought on what is to come in your life. The more immediate future which we have a general idea of, but often let get away ahead of ourselves.
"Difficult to see. Always in motion is the future." - Yoda, EBS
"You cannot prevent what you cannot see coming. You can only do what you think is right at each moment as you live it. We can plan, hope, and dread the future. What we cannot do is know it." - Qui-gon Jinn, p. 114
Jedi Apprentice Series - The Uncertain Path

Many seek ways to divine the future. To know what is going to happen next. This was something we touched on a couple lessons back. But instead of worrying about what the future might hold and trying to uncover its secrets, seek to have trust. Not faith, but trust in yourself, your training as a Jedi, and the Force. Rely on your training and do the best you can in any given situation, be mindful of the future, but do not waste precious time and energy on something you cannot fully control.

We can plan, scheme, plot, fear, seek, hide, yet the future will never be something that we should seek mastery over. It is not for us to play gods with the world or lives. We are merely to act as we know how to, as Jedi. To live within the moment, act logically and reasonably within the moment. Working from knowledge, experience, skill, and understanding.

As Jedi we cannot get hung up on knowing the future. Rather we need to focus on training, living, and acting as Jedi. And trusting in ourselves, our training, and the Force to have things work out as they should. We cannot always be the hero, but we can make ourselves available to those that need us within the moment.

Now let us look at that scary future...
Yoda: Soon will I rest, yes, forever sleep. Earned it I have.
Luke: Master Yoda, you can't die.
Yoda: Ah, strong am I with the Force, but not that strong. Twilight is upon me, and soon, night must fall. That is the way of things. The way of the Force.

Often times we are confronted with the Jedi Code hinting at something greater. That for a Jedi there is no death. As Jedi we study, experience, and observe the Force. As Jedi we are aware that the Force is life, it has a strong connection with all life, but we know that all life must eventually end. The Force is not good, it is not bad, but it does support life and thus it does support death.

The Way of the Jedi is something we are studying, learning, and applying daily. It is the practices and philosophies in which guide our lives. But the Way of the Force is much more broad, much more open. There are no restrictions within the Force. There is energy, knowledge, life, and death. An endless cycle that has continued for millions of years and will continue on in one form or another.

We see this in the quote above. We see that Yoda knows he has lived a long life, and that his time as a Jedi has come to an end, his life now moves on to the next stage. Now what that next stage is? Well, that is for each person to decide or not decide for themselves.
"Twilight is upon me, and soon, night must fall. That is the way of things. The way of the Force." -- Yoda
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Nine ::
What are your general thoughts on the quote(s)?
Do you feel any of the quotes speak on attachment? Why or Why Not?
Do you feel you can be attached to a specific/desired outcome?
Do you feel this is an accurate way to view the Force?
Do these quotes pass our APBP Test? Why or Why Not?
Last edited by Opie Macleod on Sat Feb 13, 2016 8:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

User avatar
Opie Macleod
JAO Administrator
JAO Administrator
Posts: 5201
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 7:09 pm
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: The Lore: Lecture Ten

Post: # 12743Post Opie Macleod
Mon Jan 18, 2016 4:59 pm

-= The Lore: Lecture Ten =-
Almost finished. Bet there is a lesson and quote that could fit that. *shurgs* Oh well. Perhaps you will find one. Something on patience, or the end really being the beginning. Anyhow, here is your assignment.
#####
:: The Lore Assignment Ten ::
Pick your favorite Star Wars Quote of all time. Give the character that says it and of course what they said it in. It can be a book, comic book, movie, tv show, video game, any Star Wars media. Doesn't have to be a Jedi, but may make the assignment easier?
Okay, so your quote - does it hold up to our APBP Test?
What do you take away from it?
What lesson does it impart for other Jedi seeking to live the Path daily?
"Had to be me. Someone else might have gotten it wrong." - Mordin Solus
ImageImageImageImage

Locked